Whenever I stumble across helpful information, I try to save it someplace locally, due to the ever-shifting nature of the internet. I’ve reprinted good information here and link-attributed it wherever applicable; if anyone has an issue with this policy, please feel free to contact me.

How to remove windows from the doorframe:
Take the inner door skins off, remove the bolt which holds the wing window frame (it’s behind the chrome button below the wing window). At the front of the door there are 2 holes. Using a 1/4 drive rachet set remove the 2 bolts – be careful not to let them drop, then lift the wing window frame out of the door, then wind down the glass and remove the 2 clips on the mechanisim at the glass, and lift out the glass. You may have to remove the wind seal rubbers at the top of the door to get it to clear. [link to thread] [link to illustrated guide]

Windshield Frame Removal:
On a Scout II, there are the 4 screws in the top that go into the roof. Then, there are four bolts behind the upper door hinges that come out. Then, there are two bolts that are above the upper door hinges, that thread vertically into the height adjustment for the w/s frame. Disconnect the wiper motor plug by the heater assembly, push the connection through the grommet. Then, open the doors and kick the top of the w/s frame backwards towards the cab area. It should go. If not, a prybar between the roof and the top of the frame will work to help seperate it. Once you get the w/s frame backwards a little bit at about a 30 degree angle, lift it straight up and it will come out easily. [link to thread]

Applying Herculiner (in kit format)

Dashboard lighting:
161, 14V, 1 cp/13 lumens, 4000 hrs
194, 14V, 2 cp/25 lumens, 2500 hrs
168, 14V, 3 cp/38 lumens, 1500 hrs –this is the stock bulb
3652, 13.5V, 6 cp/75 lumens, 700 hrs [link]

LED replacement lights – Amazon search

Basic Wiring Info:
The green wires are the ones for the dome light. The marker, running, and license plate lights are all the same circuit. Then you have the backup lights, L turn/brake, R turn/brake, and the fuel sender.

If you have the stubs of the OE wire connected to the bulkhead connector the cir numbers are as follows. #36 fuel level, #56 L turn/brake, #57 R turn/brake #68 tail #71 back up. The #’s are printed on the wire near the connector in white. [link]

IH used color coding for their wiring:
green: 18ga
black: 16ga
white: 14ga
red: 12ga
blue: 10ga.

How to remove the wiper switch (newer knob style):
If it’s the older metal knob, there should be a set screw that locks it on. If it’s the newer style plastic knob, I think there is a small metal spring clip inside that locks the knob to the shaft. I think you have to pry the clip up slightly to remove the knob without breaking it. I’m not sure through, because the wiper knob on my 1980 Scout was all ready broken and would fall off by itself. [link]

I made my tool using welding rod, I think coat hanger would work too. Heat it to red to anneal (soften) the steel, about 2″ & let it cool naturally. Then pound the last 1/2″ to a long chisel point. Next bend it 90° where the chisel point begins. Reheat it to gray, just under red & quench it in water or used oil. The quench should not be too important here. You may need to file the edges to narrow it enough to get it to slide in between the inside of the knob & the shat on the switch. It will be L shaped. Then insert it & pry the flat spring down & pull the knob back. [link]

How to remove the headlight switch:
Pull the knob all the way out as if you’re turning on the lights. There’s a small springloaded button on the underside of the switch housing behind the dash. Push the button in, and the knob will come out with the shaft attached. Use a flat-bladed screwdriver to spin the retaining collar on the front of the dash; the switch will come out after that.
AC Delco P/N D1590

How to test the gas gauge before dropping the tank:
“Disconnect the battery and pull the fuel/amp cluster from the dash, don’t disconnect the plug just pull it out far enough to tighten the nuts, you will usually find them finger tight. Re-attach to the dash and see if it works.

If that doesn’t fix it the best way to test is to go to your local Radio Shack and get a pack of 10 and 33 ohm resistors. There is a disconnect at the rt rear of the truck for the wire leading to the sender. Disconnect that and connect a 10 ohm resistor to the harness side wire and a good clean ground. With that connected the gauge should read at the “F” +/- a needle width. Connect a 33 and 4 10 ohm resistors in series and connect those to the wire and ground that should make the gauge read “E” +/- a needle width. That will test the gauge and all the wiring.

If it fails the test there, you can test at the back of the gauge. The terminal on the rt side of the gauge is the one that goes to the sender. You need to be very careful testing there, because the wires that connect to the ammeter are always hot if the battery is connected.

While you are in there I recommend replacing the stamped steel nuts with brass ones. It is one of the first things I do when I get another IH. They are 10-32. I never disconnect the plug from the circuit board as the pins on the circuit board are somewhat fragile and can come out of the board when you disconnect the plug. Those pins being loose can also be a cause of the gauge not working.”

If a pin is damaged soldering is a good idea but that can be difficult some times. The other option for some of the connections is to use a ring terminal under the stud and splice that to it’s respective wire, by-passing the pins and connector. It is also important to note to only disconnect one nut on a gauge at a time to prevent it from moving around in the housing. The only insulation is a piece of cardboard, move the gauge out of center and the stud can short out on the housing.
[link]

Reconditioning the wiper bottle motor (if it isn’t rusted to oblivion like mine):
“The motor proved to have a small impeller, brass insert, and rubber seal complete with 2 O-rings on the motor shaft. One O-ring is the same diameter as the rubber seal, the other is much smaller, not much bigger than the motor shaft. The rubber seal is about 1/2 inch wide or so, and the underside (motor side) appeared to have been originally packed with grease; all that was left was some dried-up yellow spots. I removed all the components from the motor shaft.

Using a pliers and gentle force I was able to start the motor shaft turning. A few drops of water came out of a drain hole in the front cap of the motor. Within a few moments the shaft was turning somewhat freely, so I again used a battery charger to power up the motor. This time the motor spun up, and after about 30 – 45 seconds it was running smoothly.

I packed the motor side of the rubber seal with white lithium grease and reasembled the components on the motor shaft. Since I did not have rivits to re-attach the motor to the washer bottle, I used 6-32 bolts and nuts instead. 2 different lenghts are needed; the short one is about 3/4 inch and the long one is about an inch long. Using these nuts and bolts I reattached the motor to the wash bottle.

When reinstalling the wash bottle in the Scout keep in mind that 3 of the 4 bolts go into plastic inserts; the ground wire must be on the bolt (lower right as viewed from the driver’s side) that screws into the metal inner fender.” [link to thread]

Tracing Down Electrical Shorts: Disconnect both battery cables. Put your battery on a slow= trickle charge for several days if necessary to restore a full charge. Then connect your positive cable to the battery only. Leave the negative to dangle. Take a simple 12 volt incandescent light with alligator clip on one end and a probe on the other. Ensure that all switches, fans, radios, lights etc are turned OFF. Clip the alligator clip to the loose negative cable and stick the probe end to your negative battery terminal. Bet it lights up brighter than Christmas, don’t it? Praise be! Now, reach up under your dash and remove just one fuse from the panel, then redo the battree probe. Lather, rinse, repeat one fuse at a time until you find the one what makes the test light stay dark. You’ve just isolated your problem circuit. Link to thread

Date posted: March 3, 2009 | Filed under | 1 Comment »

One Response to How-To

  1. Jim Harkins says:

    Thanks for doing this ,it help greatly on that light switch,

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