Brian stopped by last Sunday for a couple more hours of messing around with our ammo boxes, and while we didn’t finish them, we got a lot more done. The first thing we did was to slice four rubber stoppers in half, countersink the bottoms, and drill four holes in the base of the boxes to mount them as feet. When that was done we sorted out the rear mount situation to lock it into the base of the truck. What we’re doing is welding a C-channel to the back side of the box and another C-channel to a metal plate that mounts to the bed of the truck. The box side hooks in to the bed side, and when the front of the box is locked into place, that should keep the whole thing from being removed.

My neighbor’s dad is an old-school gearhead. When I met him for the first time he was behind the wheel of a maroon late-model Dodge Challenger. Soon he replaced that with a blue model. And a couple of years ago he showed up with a bright yellow ’68 Camaro with an angry, lumpy cam and racing slicks. I walked out and talked cars with him for a while, and we got on the subject of paint. He was looking to get rid of the yellow as soon as he could, and I mentioned I was looking to get rid of the purple on Peer Pressure just as quickly. We talked about leads and shared what we knew. Time passed, and I would hear the Camaro rumbling up the street now and again. This spring it showed up silver—I thought he’d stripped it down to bare metal—and then a pair of black stripes appeared up the hood. It looks a million times better; the silver accentuates the lines of the car and it looks much, much meaner.

A week and a half ago I was walking Hazel and we saw him at the 7-11 at the far end of our route. We got to talking and he asked if I was still interested in painting the truck; he’d retired a few months back and built himself a spray booth to reshoot the Camaro, and was now taking on painting jobs. I said HELL YES in no uncertain terms, and told him to slot me in for the spring—he’s got a car lined up to work on in the fall, and I don’t want the truck off the road for too long.

I’m not looking to spend months with a block sander and Bondo to get the metal on PP perfectly flat; I’d be happy with a decent 10-footer as long as the paint was all one color. I’ll have to hustle in the fall, though, because there are several things that would need to be addressed before it went in to the booth:

  • One or more of the three windshield frames needs to be cleaned up, sanded, have new metal welded in to the windshield lip, get filled with chassis encapsulator, and made ready for paint.
  • All of the random holes on PP’s body need to be sanded down and filled, preferably with welds, and then smoothed over for paint. This includes the old mirror mounts on each door, the trim mounts along the bottom of the body, and the snap holes along the back of the tailgate.
  • The orange hood needs to be sanded down and cleaned up at the very least—it’s pitted along the front edge.
  • The dent in the rear endcap from the swinging bumper needs to be knocked out and filled.
  • Whatever I do, I want to paint the Traveltop white for a classic ’70’s look. It needs a whole lot of attention on its own: there are multiple places where the PO screwed into the metal and left them there, so all of those need to come out and be plug welded. The rack needs to come off, the windows need to come out, and the rain gutter needs to be sandblasted and re-sealed. I’d also like to add some sound deadener to the interior.
  • Finally, any and all spare panels I’ve got should be cleaned up and shot with the same paint, if possible.

I have experience with sanding and Bondo, having done some extensive slap-hammer and sanding work on my old VW bus thirty years ago, and I’m sure a middle-aged Bill can do a much better job than a 17-year old Bill.

I bought some new tools last weekend, including a second angle grinder and a pneumatic DA sander, and I’ve got a bunch of consumables on order from Amazon including wet/dry sandpaper, etching primer, and a copper welding backer, as well as a can of chassis rust encapsulator.

So, in order of importance, I’ve got to:

  • Do a walk-around and inventory all of the issues on the body
  • Practice welding holes closed in washing machine steel
  • Sand chips in paint around the tub and sheetmetal
  • Knock down any drips in the purple paint
  • Sand and weld the holes shut in the body
    • Bondo and prep those areas for paint
    • Remove all badging and chrome
  • Pull glass from the second spare windshield
    • Evaluate and choose the best candidate for repair
    • Plug holes on the good spare
    • Encapsulate rust inside the frame
    • Weld in good metal around the inside lip
    • Prep for paint
  • Plug holes in white fender
  • Use aircraft stripper on the blue fender, sand and repair

It’s going to be a busy fall, I think.

Date posted: September 4, 2020 | Filed under Future Plans, Paint | 3 Comments »

3 Responses to Possibilities and Plans.

  1. Neal in Boston says:

    Rock on, man! Git ‘er done!
    Looks like a good list.

    Be sure that the washing machine steel that you practice in isn’t in your laundry room! Still have that welder, right?

    You haven’t mentioned color at all other than the white for the traveltop.
    What are you thinking?

    I think I would feel paralyzed having to actually choose! I know I have some runners-up, but I’d have a hard time finalizing a decision.
    Where are you with that, or do you just already KNOW?!?

    Ps- I really wish we were neighbors.

  2. Neal in Boston says:

    And also, what about adding interior work to your list? Door panels etc? I think I remember that you did a roll-on bedliner for the floor, but what about other parts and the insides of the quarters, Foot wells, tailgate, etc?

  3. bill says:

    Ha ha Neal, yep, we just replaced our washing machine so I stole a bunch of the steel before they hauled the carcass away. More on that, and color choices, in a future update.

    As for interior work—I’m gonna tackle the outside first. There’s so much to get to, including sheet metal repair to the inner A pillars, that I’d need to fix first before I did anything to door cards or dashboard (which is still purple). The floors all the way up to the firewall are covered in bedliner, and the PO cut and installed a real nice sheet of aluminum diamondplate over the inside of the tailgate so I don’t have to worry about any of that right now.

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